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The D&M Coffee roaster road show would start in a small building behind the old Wippel station, lead to the back of the former D&M headquarters at 215 W. Third Ave. and finally reach its destination in a renovated facility off of Washington Avenue, adjacent to Goodwill and Fred Meyer.

D&M switched from the West Third Avenue to the Washington Avenue roasting facility late in 2016.

“It has about three times more space,” said Mark Holloway, D&M co-owner. “It was too crowded and we had no access for trucks to load and unload.”

There was a building at the location but it is being renovated to meet D&M’s needs, which start but don’t end with the roasting facility.

Holloway said the working name for the project is the D&M Roastery and Public House.

“The front end of the building will be a place where you can grab a beer and a snack,” Holloway said.

The public house section would feature craft brews and face a large window where people can watch the coffee roasting take place in back.

Holloway said the public house portion of the business probably will open in the spring.

Roaster upgrade

The new roaster is a step up in technology.

“It has more capacity than the previous equipment,” Holloway said. “It is more efficient.”

The set-up has a weigh-fill machine set up for five-pound bags.

“It’s much more accurate,” Holloway said.

Over the course of the history of D&M the equipment has steadily evolved.

“We’ve been doing it for almost 30 years,” Holloway said.

Holloway and co-owner Donna Malek started D&M in a mobile trailer, primarily serving concerts at the Gorge. The business has steadily expanded to multiple coffee shop locations. In 2013, they added the Cornerstone Pie restaurant.

D&M had gradually been moving out of its 215 W. Third Ave. location. The headquarters were moved to the second floor of Cornerstone Pie and the espresso bar was closed. Holloway said they then sold the building.

The location of Washington Avenue is better suited to the needs of a production facility. Since the Third Avenue spot did not have a loading dock, Holloway said the loads of coffee had to be wheeled across the old wood floors and out the front door.

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