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Twin Ellensburg brothers pleaded guilty Friday morning to charges of attempted murder for setting the home they lived in on fire in an attempt to kill their father on Sept. 16.

Caleb and Joshua Bledsoe, both 25, pleaded guilty to second-degree domestic violence attempted murder and were sentenced to nine years in prison and 36 months community custody upon release.

The two men and their father, 70-year-old William Bledsoe, lived together in a home on South Railroad Avenue and worked together at Bledsoe & Sons Gutters and Sheet Metal in Ellensburg.

One of the men was treated at the scene of the fire for smoke inhalation, but there were no other injuries reported.

“This was a negotiated resolution between the parties — taking into account the interests of the community, the seriousness of the crime charged and the input of the victim and the family,” said county Deputy Prosecutor Chris Herion in a statement.

The two originally were charged with first-degree attempted murder, arson and possession of improvised explosive devices.

Firefighters and police arrived the day of the fire to find the three men. An Ellensburg Police Department investigation determined that the twins set the house on fire, using kerosene, and placed improvised explosive devices around the home.

Police also found evidence the brothers were preparing to flee the country, and recovered cash, passports and firearms packed into a vehicle with their belongings, Herion said.

They were sentenced by visiting judge Michael G. McCarthy of Yakima County Superior Court.

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